Ayleo and Mateo Bowles, better known as the dynamic dance duo Ayo & Teo, memorably burst onto the Billboard Hot 100 last year with their debut luxury anthem “Rolex,” accompanied by an instructional dance video that went viral. Given their infectious ode to the high-end wristwatch (which followed a scene-stealing appearance in Usher’s “No Limit” video), it’s perhaps no surprise that the brothers have since broken into the fashion world: just this month, they performed for Philipp Plein and Converse, and designed a celebrity capsule collection for Fanstereo. Seeing their lively harlequin approach to dress, it’s clear Ayo & Teo know a thing or two about looking fresh while getting down.

There’s no question that their shared personal style evolved out of simple necessity. “Dance influences what we wear,” Ayo says, “but we always dress crazy.” Think stretchy denim, breathable T-shirts, and, of course, proper footwear to accommodate their complex footwork. Retro Jordans 1 to 17 are their sneakers of choice, given the model’s hard-toe base and generous ankle support. As professional dancers, their clothing is restricted to what they can sweat in, and so, they rely on eccentric details to make their outfits pop.

Both brothers own 15-inch gold chokers adorned with diamonds and frequently hang bandanas and key chains off their pants loopholes. They are most recognizable in their signature face masks, which are embossed with everything from camo and black-and-white graphic stripes to cartoon animal snouts. “We kept getting video comments like ‘your facial expressions are very, very funny,’ ” Ayo says. To remedy the problem, he simply “ordered a bunch of face masks off eBay and that was it.” Naturally, the crown jewels in their extensive accessories collections are two Rolexes: Ayo owns a sterling silver band with 17- and 16-carat bust down diamonds, and Teo’s is a classic yellow gold.

Ayo & Teo’s dance repertoire—a bricolage of the robot, break dancing, and Memphis jookin, cultivated during their childhoods in Ann Arbor, Michigan—matches their offbeat shopping style. “I buy stuff that just looks weird,” Teo says, referring to an instance where he purchased a Loewe shirt with sleeves embellished with black fabric wings. “Everyone was looking at me like I was crazy, but I don’t care.” This nonconformist attitude has always been an intrinsic part of his approach to fashion. “I used to go to Walmart, get some needles, and hand sew all day and all night to make a shirt for school the next day,” he says.

For a clearer picture of Ayo & Teo’s statement style, look no further than their own merchandise line, which launched last October. There are white tees stamped with a “reverse gang” logo (a reference to their ability to physically rewind any dance move), as well as dragon eye, brown bear, and panda face masks that let you stunt like the dynamic dance duo—Rolex not included.